Scrooge McDuck Wikia
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{{Character
 
{{Character
 
|title1 = The Phantom of the Opera
 
|title1 = The Phantom of the Opera
|image1 = PhantomOfTheOpera.png
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|image1 = Phantom_of_the_Opera.png
|aliases = Erik <small>(presumably)</small>
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|aliases = Erik <small>(presumably)</small><br>The Phantom
 
|species = Human
 
|species = Human
 
|residence = [[Hotel Transylvania]] <small> (presumably temporarily) </small>
 
|residence = [[Hotel Transylvania]] <small> (presumably temporarily) </small>
  +
|children = [[Gustave de Chagny]]
|first_seen = October the 15th, 2004
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|first_seen = July the 14th, 1930
|in = ''[[Hotel Transylvania]]''
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|in = ''[[Spooks (cartoon)|Spooks]]''
|index = <small>'''''[[:Category:Phantom_of_the_Opera_stories|Phantom of the Opera stories]]'''''</small>
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|index = <small>'''''[[:Category:Phantom of the Opera stories|Phantom of the Opera stories]]'''''</small>
 
}}The '''Phantom of the Opera''', who has been known by the alias of '''Erik''', is a monstrously deformed, possibly immortal human man.
 
}}The '''Phantom of the Opera''', who has been known by the alias of '''Erik''', is a monstrously deformed, possibly immortal human man.
 
== Description ==
 
== Description ==
The Phantom of the Opera is a notorious horror figure, a monstrously disfigured man with a flair for dramatics and a heavenly singing voice. At some point prior to 2010, a musical entitled ''The Phantom of the Opera'', presumed to be loosely based on legends and rumors of the real figure, was written and debuted.<ref>As seen in the 2010 story ''[[Phantom of the Opera (2010 story)|Phantom of the Opera]]''.</ref>
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The Phantom of the Opera is a notorious horror figure, a monstrously disfigured man with a flair for dramatics, a heavenly singing voice, and a particular affinity for kidnapping attractive young women and force them to listen to his discordant organ-playing (something which [[Ortensia Rabbit]] found out the hard way in 1930{{Non-Disney Tag}}). Earlier in life, the Phantom somehow had a normal-looking son called [[Gustave de Chagny|Gustave]], who befriended a young [[Melanie Ravenswood]] on the occasion of the Phantom being invited to [[Thunder Mesa]] by [[Phantom|Henry Ravenswood]].<ref>As seen in the 2020 comic ''[[Phantom Dads]]''.</ref>{{Non-Disney Tag}}
   
  +
At some point prior to 2010, a musical entitled ''The Phantom of the Opera'', presumed to be loosely based on legends and rumors of the real figure, was written and debuted.<ref>As seen in the 2010 story ''[[Phantom of the Opera (2010 story)|Phantom of the Opera]]''.</ref>
In 2004, the Phantom checked in to the [[Hotel Transylvania (location)|Hotel Transylvania]], preparing for a recital that he would (fittingly enough) give at a nearby opera, but lost his voice right before the concert. [[Norman]], who was also staying at the Hotel along with his [[Grimhilde|mistress]], alerted the concierge, [[Donald Duck]], who mixed up an instant cure for the Phantom. Unfortunately, it worked so well that the Phantom's strident voice shattered all the windows in the hotel.
 
  +
 
In 2004, the Phantom checked in to the [[Hotel Transylvania (location)|Hotel Transylvania]], preparing for a recital that he would (fittingly enough) give at a nearby opera, but lost his voice right before the concert. [[Norman]], who was also staying at the Hotel along with his [[Grimhilde|mistress]], alerted the concierge, [[Donald Duck]], who mixed up an instant cure for the Phantom. Unfortunately, it worked so well that the Phantom's strident voice shattered all the windows in the hotel.<ref>As seen in the 2004 comic story ''[[Hotel Transylvania]]''.</ref>
 
== Behind the scenes ==
 
== Behind the scenes ==
This version of the Phantom of the Opera, transparently based on the character from Gaston Leroux's eponymous novel and its various adaptations (including, design-wise, the seminal Lon Chaney Jr. film portrayal), first appeared in 2004 in ''[[Hotel Transylvania]]''.
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This version of the Phantom of the Opera, transparently based on the character from Gaston Leroux's eponymous novel and its various adaptations (including, design-wise, the seminal Lon Chaney Jr. film portrayal), first appeared in the 1930 ''[[Oswald the Lucky Rabbit (series)|Oswald the Lucky Rabbit]]'' cartoon ''[[Spooks (cartoon)|Spooks]]''. He was also seen in the 2004 [[Donald Duck]] comic story ''[[Hotel Transylvania]]'', drawn in a somewhat more realistic style. An incarnation of the character based on his depiction in the 2010 musical ''[[wikipedia:Love Never Dies (musical)|Love Never Dies]]'' made a guest appearance in a 2020, parodical ''[[Mal's Manor]]'' comic, ''[[Phantom Dads]]''.
  +
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The Phantom speaks numerous lines in the 1930 cartoon. However, the name of the actor who played is not publicly known as of 2020.
 
===References===
 
===References===
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{{reflist}}
<references/>
 
 
[[Category:Characters]]
 
[[Category:Characters]]
 
[[Category:Males]]
 
[[Category:Males]]
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[[Category:Humans]]
 
[[Category:Humans]]
 
[[Category:Immortal]]
 
[[Category:Immortal]]
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[[Category:Villains]]
  +
[[Category:Antagonists]]
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[[Category:Phantom of the Opera's family]]

Latest revision as of 18:20, 11 July 2020

The Phantom of the Opera, who has been known by the alias of Erik, is a monstrously deformed, possibly immortal human man.

Description

The Phantom of the Opera is a notorious horror figure, a monstrously disfigured man with a flair for dramatics, a heavenly singing voice, and a particular affinity for kidnapping attractive young women and force them to listen to his discordant organ-playing (something which Ortensia Rabbit found out the hard way in 1930[NON-DISNEY]). Earlier in life, the Phantom somehow had a normal-looking son called Gustave, who befriended a young Melanie Ravenswood on the occasion of the Phantom being invited to Thunder Mesa by Henry Ravenswood.[1][NON-DISNEY]

At some point prior to 2010, a musical entitled The Phantom of the Opera, presumed to be loosely based on legends and rumors of the real figure, was written and debuted.[2]

In 2004, the Phantom checked in to the Hotel Transylvania, preparing for a recital that he would (fittingly enough) give at a nearby opera, but lost his voice right before the concert. Norman, who was also staying at the Hotel along with his mistress, alerted the concierge, Donald Duck, who mixed up an instant cure for the Phantom. Unfortunately, it worked so well that the Phantom's strident voice shattered all the windows in the hotel.[3]

Behind the scenes

This version of the Phantom of the Opera, transparently based on the character from Gaston Leroux's eponymous novel and its various adaptations (including, design-wise, the seminal Lon Chaney Jr. film portrayal), first appeared in the 1930 Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoon Spooks. He was also seen in the 2004 Donald Duck comic story Hotel Transylvania, drawn in a somewhat more realistic style. An incarnation of the character based on his depiction in the 2010 musical Love Never Dies made a guest appearance in a 2020, parodical Mal's Manor comic, Phantom Dads.

The Phantom speaks numerous lines in the 1930 cartoon. However, the name of the actor who played is not publicly known as of 2020.

References

  1. As seen in the 2020 comic Phantom Dads.
  2. As seen in the 2010 story Phantom of the Opera.
  3. As seen in the 2004 comic story Hotel Transylvania.