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(~ Ducktor Who)
 
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}}'''''The Son of the Sun''''' is the first [[Scrooge McDuck|Uncle Scrooge]] story written and drawn by [[Don Rosa]]. It features [[Scrooge McDuck]], [[Donald Duck]], [[Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck]], [[Mr Billups]] and [[Flintheart Glomgold]].
 
}}'''''The Son of the Sun''''' is the first [[Scrooge McDuck|Uncle Scrooge]] story written and drawn by [[Don Rosa]]. It features [[Scrooge McDuck]], [[Donald Duck]], [[Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck]], [[Mr Billups]] and [[Flintheart Glomgold]].
 
==Plot==
 
==Plot==
[[Scrooge McDuck|Scrooge]] has lent his various treasures and historical artifacts to the Museum of Duckburg for a temporary exposition. Visiting the museum himself, he comes across [[Flintheart Glomgold|Glomgold]], who has lent the Museum some of his most extraordinary diamonds. Glomgold begins to argue with Scrooge, claiming that it was an easy cheating of Scrooge's to "steal" ancient artifacts rather than earn his money himself. Scrooge, to prove him that finding a legendary treasure ''isn't'' easy, dares him to a race for one treasure he still hasn't found, the legendary Incan gold hidden in the temple of Manco Capac, the Son of the Sun…
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[[Scrooge McDuck|Scrooge]] has lent his various treasures and historical artifacts to the Museum of Duckburg for a temporary exposition. Visiting the museum himself, he comes across [[Flintheart Glomgold|Glomgold]], who has lent the Museum some of his most extraordinary diamonds. Glomgold begins to argue with Scrooge, claiming that it was an easy cheating of Scrooge's to "steal" ancient artifacts rather than earn his money himself. Scrooge, to prove to him that finding a legendary treasure ''isn't'' easy, dares him to a race for one treasure he still hasn't found, the legendary Incan gold hidden in the temple of Manco Capac, the Son of the Sun…
 
==Behind the Scenes==
 
==Behind the Scenes==
 
''The Son of the Sun'' was first published in ''Uncle Scrooge #219'' (in the United States of America) on April the 7th, 1987. It can also be found in ''Gladstone Giant Album'' #4, ''Uncle Scrooge Adventures in Color'' #5, ''Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck in Color'' #2, ''Uncle Scrooge'' #335 and ''[[The Don Rosa Library]]'' [[Volume 1: The Son of the Sun|#1]].
 
''The Son of the Sun'' was first published in ''Uncle Scrooge #219'' (in the United States of America) on April the 7th, 1987. It can also be found in ''Gladstone Giant Album'' #4, ''Uncle Scrooge Adventures in Color'' #5, ''Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck in Color'' #2, ''Uncle Scrooge'' #335 and ''[[The Don Rosa Library]]'' [[Volume 1: The Son of the Sun|#1]].

Latest revision as of 14:33, November 2, 2019

The Son of the Sun is the first Uncle Scrooge story written and drawn by Don Rosa. It features Scrooge McDuckDonald DuckHuey, Dewey and Louie DuckMr Billups and Flintheart Glomgold.

PlotEdit

Scrooge has lent his various treasures and historical artifacts to the Museum of Duckburg for a temporary exposition. Visiting the museum himself, he comes across Glomgold, who has lent the Museum some of his most extraordinary diamonds. Glomgold begins to argue with Scrooge, claiming that it was an easy cheating of Scrooge's to "steal" ancient artifacts rather than earn his money himself. Scrooge, to prove to him that finding a legendary treasure isn't easy, dares him to a race for one treasure he still hasn't found, the legendary Incan gold hidden in the temple of Manco Capac, the Son of the Sun…

Behind the ScenesEdit

The Son of the Sun was first published in Uncle Scrooge #219 (in the United States of America) on April the 7th, 1987. It can also be found in Gladstone Giant Album #4, Uncle Scrooge Adventures in Color #5, Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck in Color #2, Uncle Scrooge #335 and The Don Rosa Library #1.

It was Keno Don Rosa's first official Disney comic story. To enforce from the very beginning his status as a Carl Barks fan, the opening scene with Scrooge's treasures is filled with allusion to some of Barks's most famous Scrooge stories (the treasures shown are almost exclusively from those stories: the Philospher's Stone, the Golden Fleece, King Solomon's treasure, etc.). 

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