FANDOM


Trial of the Unicorn is an unofficial comic story written and drawn by Sarah Jolley. It features Gladstone Gander, Magica De Spell, Unie the Unicorn, Scrooge McDuck and, in his debut, Lord Leopold Lioneyes. Daphne Duck, Donald Duck, Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck and the Beagle Boys are mentioned, with Donald appearing briefly in flashback form, and the fictional Mustapha Handout (also seen in flashbacks) is of great importance to the plot's unfolding.

Description Edit

An insane British scientist-slash-businessman-slash-musician, Lord Leopold Lioneyes, has created a foolproof way to gather up hundreds of magical creatures and harvest them for rare magical ingredients to sell to an untapped-market the witches of the world! Magica De Spell cannot help but try to stop the madman, especially when it turns out that Lioneyes's method for gathering up magical creatures has also lured Gladstone Gander to the slaughter… Meanwhile, Gladstone himself, who finds Unie the Unicorn there among the creatures, must confront one of his worst memories.

ReferencesEdit

ContinuityEdit

Behind the scenes Edit

This story is the 26th of a series of unofficial homages to the characters written and drawn by Sarah Jolley (author of the acclaimed comic The Property of Hate). It was released in 2019 for free on the Internet.

The story's release (split in five parts) began on April the 9th, the official international Unicorn Day.

The story was partially written to present an in-universe "apology" from Gladstone Gander for his actions in Trail of the Unicorn (1950), and particularly the sequence (horribly inappropriate by modern standards, though only meant as light fun at the time) wherein he dresses up as a caricature of an Indian man, complete with tarred feather to mimick dark skin.

Due to this sensitive theme, it included a written foreword from Jolley. Gladstone's monologue in the epilogue of the story, where he speaks about Scrooge McDuck and how despite the occasional mistake he is funadmentally "a good duck, man" is also to be taken as a metafictional reference to Carl Barks, the “good duck man”, stressing that no ill will against Barks is to be held over his occasional, generally mild, and era-steeped insensitiveness, for all that the story stressed how said instances of insensitiveness in his stories were nevertheless "not okay".

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.